Royal Wedding Screen 2 articles

Royal Wedding

1951

Royal Wedding Poster
  • There's a world of difference between Gene Kelly, who starred in and co-directed Donen's first movie and became associated with the director early in his career, and this film's star: Astaire is the gentleman to Kelly's athlete; if Gene Kelly appears to bend space and time through the force of his will, Astaire dances like a disinterested God. Astaire's charm was his virtuoso elegance, a long way from Kelly's unbridled energy, which would always have an equal in Donen's uncontrolled vigor.

  • Donen’s exuberance and Nick Castle’s choreography give him some of his most inspired numbers, including . . . the brilliantly engineered “dancing on the ceiling” sequence, made with the help of a rotating room and camera. The movie concludes with a dazzling cinematic invention: using scrims and sidelighting, Donen entangles Astaire in swirling, elusive patterns that represent the first new way of filming dance since the heyday of Busby Berkeley.