The Front Page Screen 4 articles

The Front Page

1931

The Front Page Poster
  • Much of The Front Page lacks dynamism, a point largely attributable to the fidelity with which Milestone treats Hecht's verbose screenplay. Where Hawks would search for something more musical in the rhythms of Hecht's words with overlapping voices and offbeat inflections, Milestone cultivates a nasally, top-of-the-lungs shout almost uniformly across the cast and respectfully gives each performer their chance to finish their lines before the next one speaks.

  • Spiritual kin to SCARFACE (another Howard Hughes production) and Raoul Walsh's contemporaneous cycle of urban proletariat scuzz, THE FRONT PAGE possesses an undeniable vulgar dynamism.

  • This phenomenally fast-moving early screwball comedy has for years circulated in theatrical prints of dubious quality, a situation to be hopefully changed by the arrival of a new 35mm restoration... Although the play has been adapted for cinema a number of times (most notably with Howard Hawks’s 1940 comedy of remarriage, His Girl Friday), this version is by far the spiciest.

  • Milestone’s The Front Page presents Hecht and MacArthur’s original play perfected yet still in the raw—with its male chauvinism and meanness as well as its gallantry in full view. These men may goad Molly Malloy nearly to her death, but they mostly laugh and cheer when Hildy kisses Jenny the scrubwoman and dances her out of the pressroom. This movie captures every bit of the remarkable texture that Hecht and MacArthur put into their play.

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