The Wire Screen 3 articles

The Wire

2002

The Wire Poster
  • For me, the principal problem with The Wire is the feeling of journalistic hipness it constantly projects, which cumulatively fosters a smug sense of sophistication about the way that big-city corruption is said to function in Baltimore. Even when this smugness seems warranted, I question the sort of defeatist self-satisfaction it frequently promotes in the viewer, similar to the cynicism that remains so central to the appeal of the Godfather films.

  • Despite The Wire’s density, it is rarely difficult to follow, yet—crucially—the dialogue remains free of clunky exposition. The logical conclusion to draw from this is that The Wire is a fine example of pure visual storytelling, which is surely a key facet of both successful television and cinema.

  • Revisited seven years after its finale, “The Wire” — a show whose ambition and scope are matched by its skillful editing, pungent dialogue, deep ensemble and overriding sense of place — feels less timeless than perpetually and disturbingly timely.

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