Tired Moonlight Screen 6 articles

Tired Moonlight

2015

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  • West proves she has a keen eye for the quotidian, capturing as much as the characters' expressions, the simple movements of their shoulders and hands. The filmmaker dwells on the fly in the room and the ending to a successful solitaire match. And this is one of the film's greatest strengths: that it can effectively harness the droll, unassuming moments of daily life into some semblance of meaning for the characters.

  • Slamdance brings Britni West’s debut Tired Moonlight, a film, like Western, which nicely exemplifies the flowering American docu-fiction movement; featuring a cast of both amateurs and professionals engaging in the routine pleasures and particulars of modern day Montana, it’s a work of small moments and natural wonders.

  • Tired Moonlight offers a vivid collection of faces and personalities, all bound together by mutual economic hardship, seeming existential boredom, and chronic loneliness but in no way limited in their similarities to those fundamental woes. What irks is the repeated, specificity-destroying implication that these people are paragons of the American spirit simply because of their modest resilience.

  • Britni West’s Best Narrative Feature-winning Tired Moonlight, her debut feature, is a strange and glorious mix of idiosyncratic fiction, observational landscape documentary and bad poetry that simply blew me away. Burnt-beautiful and flowing like a kinky Montana creek, it’s an affecting reminder that cinema can and should be the territory of the artist creating new forms by capturing and editing the particular world she inhabits.

  • An interwoven portrait of the inhabitants and topography of Kalispell, Montana, West collapses the conventions of an ensemble driven film by allowing her characters to roam free, presenting a beautiful, like-minded series of vignettes that form a cohesive whole.

  • The lives of the characters... frequently orbit around bargain-hunting, reselling, throwing things out and cleaning things up, making Tired Moonlight a film about remnants, and making its ensemble finale, at the town’s July 4th celebration, into some kind of American elegy.

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